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Vegetable Seeds

Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

Nothing beats a home grown garden.

Shop from our various vegetable garden seed varieties for your home grown garden.

Why stock up at the groceries when you can have unlimited supply in your very own backyard. 

 

Subcategories

  • Amaranth

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    You can also use it to add a lovely texture to baked goods or homemade granola. With an earthy, nutty flavor, amaranth is perfect for breakfast, lunch, dinner and every snack in between. For a pilaf, bring 1 ½ cups water and ¼ teaspoon salt to a boil in a medium pot.

  • Artichoke

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Artichoke Vegetable Seeds

    This vegetable grows to 1.4–2 m (4 ft 7 in–6 ft 7 in) tall, with arching, deeply lobed, silvery, glaucous-green leaves 50–83 cm (19+1⁄2–32+1⁄2 in) long. The flowers develop in a large head from an edible bud about 8–15 cm (3–6 in) diameter with numerous triangular scales; the individual florets are purple. The edible portions of the buds consist primarily of the fleshy lower portions of the involucral bracts and the base, known as the heart; the mass of immature florets in the center of the bud is called the choke or beard. These are inedible in older, larger flowers.

  • Arugula

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Arugula (American English) or rocket (British English) (Eruca vesicaria; syns. Eruca sativa Mill., E. vesicaria subsp. sativa (Miller) Thell., Brassica eruca L.) is an edible annual plant in the family Brassicaceae used as a leaf vegetable for its fresh, tart, bitter, and peppery flavor. Other common names include garden rocket[1] (in Britain, Australia, South Africa, Ireland, and New Zealand),[2] and eruca.[2] It is also called "ruchetta", "rucola", "rucoli", "rugula", "colewort", and "roquette". Eruca sativa, which is widely popular as a salad vegetable, is a species of Eruca native to the Mediterranean region, from Morocco and Portugal in the west to Syria, Lebanon, Egypt and Turkey in the east.[3][2]

  • Asparagus

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Asparagus, or garden asparagus, folk name sparrow grass, scientific name Asparagus officinalis, is a perennial flowering plant species in the genus Asparagus. Its young shoots are used as a spring vegetable.

    It was once classified in the lily family, like the related Allium species, onions and garlic. However, genetic research places lilies, Allium, and asparagus in three separate families—the Liliaceae, Amaryllidaceae, and Asparagaceae, respectively— the Amaryllidaceae and Asparagaceae are grouped together in the order Asparagales. Sources differ as to the native range of Asparagus officinalis, but generally include most of Europe and western temperate Asia.[3][4][5][6] It is widely cultivated as a vegetable crop.

  • Bean/Pea

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Beet

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Beet Vegetable Seeds

    Usually the deep purple roots of beets are eaten boiled, roasted, or raw, and either alone or combined with any salad vegetable. The green, leafy portion of the beet is also edible. The young leaves can be added raw to salads, whilst the mature leaves are most commonly served boiled or steamed, in which case they have a taste and texture similar to spinach. Beetroot can be roasted, boiled or steamed, peeled, and then eaten warm with or without butter as a delicacy; cooked, pickled, and then eaten cold as a condiment; or peeled, shredded raw, and then eaten as a salad. Pickled beets are a traditional food in many countries.

  • Bitter Melon

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Bitter melon is generally consumed cooked in the green or early yellowing stage. The young shoots and leaves of the bitter melon may also be eaten as greens. The fruit is very bitter raw and can be soaked in cold water and drained to remove some of those strong flavours.

    In Chinese cuisine, bitter melon (苦瓜, pinyin: kǔguā; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: khó͘-koe) is valued for its bitter flavour, typically in stir-fries (often with pork and douchi), soups, dim sum, and herbal teas (gohyah tea). It has also been used in place of hops as the bittering ingredient in some beers in China and Okinawa.[5]

    Bitter gourd is commonly eaten throughout India. In North Indian cuisine, it is often served with yogurt on the side to offset the bitterness, used in curry such as sabzi or stuffed with spices and then cooked in oil.

    In South Indian cuisine, it is used in numerous dishes such as thoran / thuvaran (mixed with grated coconut), pavaikka mezhukkupuratti (stir-fried with spices), theeyal (cooked with roasted coconut) and pachadi (which is considered a medicinal food for diabetics), making it vital in Malayali's diet. Other popular recipes include preparations with curry, deep-frying with peanuts or other ground nuts, and Kakara kaya pulusu in Telugu, a soup with fried onions and other spices. In Karnataka bitter melon is known as hāgalakāyi (ಹಾಗಲಕಾಯಿ) in Kannada; in Tamil Nadu it is known as paagarkaai or pavakai (பாகற்காய்) in Tamil.[6] In these regions, a special preparation called pagarkai pitla, a kind of sour koottu, is common. Also commonly seen is kattu pagarkkai, a curry in which bitter melons are stuffed with onions, cooked lentil and grated coconut mix, then tied with thread and fried in oil. In the Konkan region of Maharashtra, salt is added to finely chopped bitter gourd, known as karle (कारले) in Marathi, and then it is squeezed, removing its bitter juice to some extent. After frying this with different spices, the less bitter and crispy preparation is served with grated coconut. Bitter melon is known as karate (Konkani: कारांतें) in Goa; it is valued for its health benefits and used widely in Goan cuisine. In Bengal bitter melon is often simply eaten boiled and mashed with salt, mustard oil, sliced thinly and deep fried, added to lentils to make "tetor" dal (bitter lentils), and is a key ingredient of the Shukto, a Bengali vegetable medley that is a mixture of several vegetables like raw banana, drumstick stems, bori and sweet potato.

    In northern India and Nepal, bitter melon, known as tite karela (तीते करेला) in Nepali, is prepared as a fresh pickle. For this, the vegetable is cut into cubes or slices, and sautéed with oil and a sprinkle of water. When it is softened and reduced, it is crushed in a mortar with a few cloves of garlic, salt and a red or green pepper. It is also eaten sautéed to golden-brown, stuffed, or as a curry on its own or with potatoes.

    In Burmese cuisine, bitter melon is sauteéd with garlic, tomatoes, spices and dried shrimp and is served as an accompaniment to other dishes. Such a dish is available at street stalls and deli counters throughout the country.

    In Sri Lanka, it is known as Sinhala: කරවිල karavila and is an ingredient in many different curry dishes (e.g., karawila curry and karawila sambol) which are served mainly with rice in a main meal. Sometimes large grated coconut pieces are added, which is more common in rural areas. Karawila juice is also sometimes served there.

    In Pakistan, where it is known as karela (کریلا) in Urdu-speaking areas, and Bangladesh, where it is known as korola (করলা|করলা) in Bengali, bitter melon is often cooked with onions, red chili powder, turmeric powder, salt, coriander powder, and a pinch of cumin seeds. Another dish in Pakistan calls for whole, unpeeled bitter melon to be boiled and then stuffed with cooked minced beef, served with either hot tandoori bread, naan, chappati, or with khichri (a mixture of lentils and rice).

    A soft drink made from bitter melon

    Bitter melon, known as gōyā (ゴーヤー) in Okinawan, and nigauri (苦瓜) in Japanese (although the Okinawan word gōyā is also used), is a significant ingredient in Okinawan cuisine, and is increasingly used in Japanese cuisine beyond that island.

    In Indonesian cuisine, bitter melon, known as pare in Javanese and Indonesian (also paria), is prepared in various dishes, such as gado-gado, and also stir-fried, cooked in coconut milk, or steamed. In Christian areas in Eastern Indonesia it is cooked with pork and chile, the sweetness of the pork balancing against the bitterness of the vegetable.

    In Vietnamese cuisine, raw bitter melon slices known as mướp đắng or khổ qua in Vietnamese, eaten with dried meat floss and bitter melon soup with shrimp, are common dishes. Bitter melons stuffed with ground pork are commonly served as a summer soup in the south. It is also used as the main ingredient of stewed bitter melon. This dish is usually cooked for the Tết holiday, where its "bitter" name is taken as a reminder of the bitter living conditions experienced in the past.

    In Thai cuisine, the Chinese variety of green bitter melon, mara (มะระ) in Thai, is prepared stuffed with minced pork and garlic, in a clear broth. It is also served sliced, stir-fried with garlic and fish sauce until just tender. Varieties found in Thailand range from large fruit to small fruit. The smallest fruit variety (mara khii nok) is generally not cultivated, but is occasionally found in the wild and is considered the most nutritious variety.

    In the cuisine of the Philippines, bitter melon, known as ampalaya in Tagalog and parya in Ilokano, may be stir-fried with ground beef and oyster sauce, or with eggs and diced tomato. The dish pinakbet, popular in the Ilocos region of Luzon, consists mainly of bitter melons, eggplant, okra, string beans, tomatoes, lima beans, and other various regional vegetables all stewed together with a little bagoong-based stock.

    In Trinidad and Tobago, bitter melons, known as caraille or carilley, are usually sautéed with onion, garlic and scotch bonnet pepper until almost crisp.

    In Mauritius, bitter melons are known as margose or margoze.

  • Broccoli

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) is an edible green plant in the cabbage family (family Brassicaceae, genus Brassica) whose large flowering head, stalk and small associated leaves are eaten as a vegetable. Broccoli is classified in the Italica cultivar group of the species Brassica oleracea. Broccoli has large flower heads, usually dark green, arranged in a tree-like structure branching out from a thick stalk which is usually light green. The mass of flower heads is surrounded by leaves. Broccoli resembles cauliflower, which is a different but closely related cultivar group of the same Brassica species.

    It is eaten either raw or cooked. Broccoli is a particularly rich source of vitamin C and vitamin K. Contents of its characteristic sulfur-containing glucosinolate compounds, isothiocyanates and sulforaphane, are diminished by boiling but are better preserved by steaming, microwaving or stir-frying.

  • Brussel Sprouts

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Cabbage

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Cabbage is prepared and consumed in many ways. The simplest options include eating the vegetable raw or steaming it, though many cuisines pickle, stew, sautée or braise cabbage.[24] Pickling is a common way of preserving cabbage, creating dishes such as sauerkraut and kimchi,[14] although kimchi is more often made from Chinese cabbage (B. rapa subsp. pekinensis).[24] Savoy cabbages are usually used in salads, while smooth-leaf types are utilized for both market sales and processing.[15] Bean curd and cabbage is a staple of Chinese cooking,[74] while the British dish bubble and squeak is made primarily with leftover potato and boiled cabbage and eaten with cold meat.[75]

    In Poland, cabbage is one of the main food crops, and it features prominently in Polish cuisine. It is frequently eaten, either cooked or as sauerkraut, as a side dish or as an ingredient in such dishes as bigos (cabbage, sauerkraut, meat, and wild mushrooms, among other ingredients) gołąbki (stuffed cabbage) and pierogi (filled dumplings). Other eastern European countries, such as Hungary and Romania, also have traditional dishes that feature cabbage as a main ingredient.[76] In India and Ethiopia, cabbage is often included in spicy salads and braises.[77] In the United States, cabbage is used primarily for the production of coleslaw, followed by market use and sauerkraut production.[40]

  • Carrot

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Cauliflower

    Cauliflower Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Cauliflower heads can be roasted, grilled, boiled, fried, steamed, pickled, or eaten raw. When cooking, the outer leaves and thick stalks are typically removed, leaving only the florets (the edible "curd" or "head"). The leaves are also edible but are often discarded.

  • Celery

    Celery Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Celery is eaten around the world as a vegetable. In North America the crisp petiole (leaf stalk) is used. In Europe the hypocotyl is used as a root vegetable. The leaves are strongly flavored and are used less often, either as a flavoring in soups and stews or as a dried herb. Celery, onions, and bell peppers are the "holy trinity" of Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine. Celery, onions, and carrots make up the French mirepoix, often used as a base for sauces and soups. Celery is a staple in many soups.[24]

  • Chicory

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Collard Greens

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Corn

    Corn Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Corn Salad
  • Cucumber

    Cucumber Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Fennel

    Fennel Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Many cultures in India, Afghanistan, Iran, and the Middle East use fennel fruits in cooking. It is one of the most important spices in Kashmiri cuisine and Gujarati cooking.[30] It is an essential ingredient of the Assamese/Bengali/Oriya spice mixture panch phoron[31] and in Chinese five-spice powders. In many parts of India, roasted fennel fruits are consumed as mukhwas, an after-meal digestive and breath freshener (saunf), or candied as comfit.

    Fennel leaves are used in some parts of India as leafy green vegetables either by themselves or mixed with other vegetables, cooked to be served and consumed as part of a meal. In Syria and Lebanon, the young leaves are used to make a special kind of egg omelette (along with onions and flour) called ijjeh.

    Many egg, fish, and other dishes employ fresh or dried fennel leaves. Florence fennel is a key ingredient in some Italian salads, often tossed with chicory and avocado, or it can be braised and served as a warm side dish. It may be blanched or marinated, or cooked in risotto.

    Fennel fruits are the primary flavor component in Italian sausage. In Spain, the stems of the fennel plant are used in the preparation of pickled eggplants, berenjenas de Almagro. An herbal tea or tisane can be made from fennel.[32]

    On account of its aromatic properties, fennel fruit forms one of the ingredients of the well-known compound liquorice powder. In the Indian subcontinent, fennel fruits are also eaten raw, sometimes with a sweetener.

    In Israel, fennel salad is made of chopped fennel bulbs flavored with salt, black pepper, lemon juice, parsley, olive oil and sometimes sumac.

  • Eggplant

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Eggplant

    Eggplant can be steamed, stir-fried, pan fried, deep fried, barbecued, roasted, stewed, curried, or pickled. Many eggplant dishes are sauces made by mashing the cooked fruit. It can be stuffed. It is frequently, but not always, cooked with oil or fat.

    Eggplant is used in the cuisines of many countries. Due to its texture and bulk, it is sometimes used as a meat substitute in vegan and vegetarian cuisines.[38] Eggplant flesh is smooth. Its numerous seeds are small, soft and edible, along with the rest of the fruit, and do not have to be removed. Its thin skin is also edible, and so it does not have to be peeled. However, the green part at the top, the calyx, does have to be removed when preparing an eggplant for cooking.

  • Endive
  • Gourds

    Gourds Vegetable Seed

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Greens
  • Ground Cherry
  • Kolrabi

    Kolrabi Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Kohlrabi stems (the enlarged vegetal part) are surrounded by two distinct fibrous layers that do not soften appreciably when cooked. These layers are generally peeled away prior to cooking or serving raw, with the result that the stems often provide a smaller amount of food than one might assume from their intact appearance.

    The bulbous kohlrabi stem is frequently used raw in salad or slaws. It has a texture similar to that of a broccoli stem, but with a flavor that is sweeter and less vegetal.

    Kohlrabi leaves are edible and can be used similarly to collard greens and kale, but take longer to cook.

    Kohlrabi is an important part of Kashmiri cuisine, where it is called Mŏnji. It is one of the most commonly cooked vegetables, along with collard greens (haakh). It is prepared with its leaves and served with a light soup and eaten with rice.

    In Cyprus, it is popularly sprinkled with salt and lemon and served as an appetizer.

  • Kale

    Kale Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    As a snack product

    Flavored "kale chips" have been produced as a potato chip substitute.

    Regional uses

    Europe

    In the Netherlands, a traditional winter dish called "boerenkoolstamppot" is a mix of curly kale and mashed potatoes, sometimes with fried bacon, and served with rookworst ("smoked sausage").[24]

    In Northern Germany, there is a winter tradition known as "Kohlfahrt" ("kale trip"), where a group of people will go on a hike through the woods during the day before gathering at an inn or private residence where kale is served, usually with bacon and Kohlwurst ("kale sausage").[25] Kale is considered a Northern German staple and comfort food.[26]

    In Italy, cavolo nero kale is an ingredient of the Tuscan soup ribollita.[27]

    A traditional Portuguese soup, caldo verde, combines pureed potatoes, very finely sliced kale, olive oil and salt.[28] Additional ingredients can include broth and sliced, cooked spicy sausage.

    In Scotland, kale provided such a base for a traditional diet that the word in some Scots dialects is synonymous with food. To be "off one's kail" is to feel too ill to eat.[29]

    In Ireland, kale is mixed with mashed potatoes to make the traditional dish colcannon.[30] It is popular on Halloween,[31] when it may be served with sausages.

    Asia:

    In Sri Lanka, It is known as 'kola gova' or ela gova. It is cultivated for edible use. A dish called 'kale mallung' is served almost everywhere in the island along with rice.

  • Leek

    Leek Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Leeks have a mild, onion-like taste. In its raw state, the vegetable is crunchy and firm. The edible portions of the leek are the white base of the leaves (above the roots and stem base), the light green parts, and to a lesser extent the dark green parts of the leaves. The dark green portion is usually discarded because it has a tough texture, but it can be sautéed, or more commonly added to stock for flavor.[10] A few leaves are sometimes tied with twine and other herbs to form a bouquet garni.

    Leeks are typically chopped into slices 5–10 mm thick. The slices have a tendency to fall apart, due to the layered structure of the leek. The different ways of preparing the vegetable are:

    Boiling turns it soft and mild in taste. (Care should be taken to chop the vegetable, or else the intact fibers that run the length of the vegetable will tangle into a ball while chewing.) Whole boiled leeks, served cold with vinaigrette is the most popular way of eating leeks in France, where leeks are called "asperge du pauvre" ("Poor man's asparagus")

    Frying leaves it crunchier and preserves the taste.

    Raw leeks can be used in salads, doing especially well when they are the prime ingredient.

    In Turkish cuisine, leeks are chopped into thick slices, then boiled and separated into leaves, and finally filled with a filling usually containing rice, herbs (generally parsley and dill), onion, and black pepper. For sarma with olive oil,[11] currants, pine nuts, and cinnamon are added, and for sarma with meat,[12] minced meat is added to the filling. In Turkey, especially zeytinyağlı pırasa (leek with olive oil), ekşili pırasa (sour leek), etli pırasa (leek with meat), pırasa musakka (leek musakka), pırasalı börek (börek with leek), and pırasa köftesi leek meatball are also cooked.

    Leeks are an ingredient of cock-a-leekie soup, leek and potato soup, and vichyssoise, as well as plain leek soup.

    Because of their symbolism in Wales (see below), they have come to be used extensively in that country’s cuisine. Elsewhere in Britain, leeks have come back into favor only in the last 50 years or so, having been overlooked for several centuries.[13]

  • Lettuce

    Lettuce Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    As described around 50 AD, lettuce leaves were often cooked and served by the Romans with an oil-and-vinegar dressing; however, smaller leaves were sometimes eaten raw. During the 81–96 AD reign of Domitian, the tradition of serving a lettuce salad before a meal began. Post-Roman Europe continued the tradition of poaching lettuce, mainly with large romaine types, as well as the method of pouring a hot oil and vinegar mixture over the leaves.[10]

    Today, the majority of lettuce is grown for its leaves, although one type is grown for its stem and one for its seeds, which are made into an oil.[22] Most lettuce is used in salads, either alone or with other greens, vegetables, meats and cheeses. Romaine lettuce is often used for Caesar salads. Lettuce leaves can also be found in soups, sandwiches and wraps, while the stems are eaten both raw and cooked.[11]

    The consumption of lettuce in China developed differently from in Western countries, due to health risks and cultural aversion to eating raw leaves; Chinese "salads" are composed of cooked vegetables and are served hot or cold. Lettuce is also used in a larger variety of dishes than in Western countries, contributing to a range of dishes including bean curd and meat dishes, soups and stir-frys plain or with other vegetables. Stem lettuce, widely consumed in China, is eaten either raw or cooked, the latter primarily in soups and stir-frys.[47] Lettuce is also used as a primary ingredient in the preparation of lettuce soup.

  • Luffa

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Luffa Sponge
  • Mesclun Mixes

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    The traditional mix includes chervil, arugula, leafy lettuces and endive, while the term mesclun may also refer to a blend [1] that might include some or all of these four and baby spinach, collard greens, Swiss chard (silver beet), mustard greens, dandelion greens, frisée, mizuna, mâche (lamb's lettuce), radicchio, sorrel, or other fresh leaf vegetables.

  • Mizuna Water Greens
  • Mustard & Greens

    Mustard Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    The leaves, seeds, and stems of this mustard variety are edible. The plant appears in some form in African, Bangladeshi, Chinese, Filipino, Italian, Indian, Japanese, Nepali, Pakistani, Korean, Southern and African-American (soul food) cuisines. Cultivars of B. juncea are grown for their greens, and for the production of oilseed. The mustard condiment made from the seeds of the B. juncea is called brown mustard and is considered to be spicier than yellow mustard.[4][5]

    The leaves are used in African cooking,[7] and all plant parts are used in Nepali cuisine, particularly in the mountain regions of Nepal, as well as in the Punjabi cuisine in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, where a dish called sarson da saag (mustard greens) is prepared.[8] B. juncea subsp. tatsai, which has a particularly thick stem, is used to make the Nepali pickle called achar, and the Chinese pickle zha cai.

    The Gorkhas of the Indian states of Darjeeling, West Bengal and Sikkim as well as Nepal prepare pork with mustard greens (also called rayo in Nepali). It is usually eaten with relish and steamed rice, but can also be eaten with roti (griddle breads). In Nepal it is also a common practice to cook these greens with meat of all sorts, especially goat meat; which is normally prepared in a pressure cooker with minimal use of spices to focus on the flavour of the greens and dry chillies. Brassica juncea (especially the seeds) is more pungent than greens from the closely related Brassica oleracea (kale, broccoli, and collard greens),[9] and is frequently mixed with these milder greens in a dish of "mixed greens".

    Chinese and Japanese cuisines also make use of mustard greens. In Japanese cuisine, it is known as takana and often pickled for use as filling in onigiri or as a condiment. Many varieties of B. juncea cultivars are used, including zha cai, mizuna, takana (var. integrifolia), juk gai choy, and xuelihong. Asian mustard greens are most often stir-fried or pickled. A Southeast Asian dish called asam gai choy or kiam chai boey is often made with leftovers from a large meal. It involves stewing mustard greens with tamarind, dried chillies and leftover meat on the bone. Brassica juncea is also known as gai choi, siu gai choi, xaio jie cai, baby mustard, Chinese leaf mustard or mostaza.[10]

  • Onion

    Onion Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Onions are commonly chopped and used as an ingredient in various hearty warm dishes, and may also be used as a main ingredient in their own right, for example in French onion soup, creamed onions, and onion chutney. They are versatile and can be baked, boiled, braised, grilled, fried, roasted, sautéed, or eaten raw in salads.[28] Their layered nature makes them easy to hollow out once cooked, facilitating stuffing them, as in Turkish sogan-dolma.

    Onions pickled in vinegar are eaten as a snack around the world, and as a side serving in pubs and fish and chip shops throughout the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth. They are part of a traditional British pub's ploughman's lunch, usually served with crusty bread, English cheese, and ale.

  • Okra

    Okra Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    In Cuba and Puerto Rico, the vegetable is referred to as quimbombó, and is used in dishes such as quimbombó guisado (stewed okra), a dish very similar to Southern gumbo.[20][21] It is also used in traditional dishes in the Dominican Republic, where it is called molondrón.[22] In India, the pods are used in many spicy vegetable preparations as well as cooked with chicken.[23][24]

  • Parsnips
  • Pepper

    Pepper Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Radish

    Radish Vegetable Seeds

    The most commonly eaten portion is the napiform or fusiform taproot, although the entire plant is edible and the tops can be used as a leaf vegetable. The seed can also be sprouted and eaten raw in a similar way to a mung bean.[27]

    The root of the radish is usually eaten raw, although tougher specimens can be steamed. The raw flesh has a crisp texture and a pungent, peppery flavor, caused by glucosinolates and the enzyme myrosinase, which combine when chewed to form allyl isothiocyanates, also present in mustard, horseradish, and wasabi.[28]

    Radishes are mostly used in salads, but also appear in many European dishes.[29] In Mexican cuisine, sliced radishes are used in combination with shredded lettuce as garnish for traditional dishes such as tostadas, sopes, enchiladas and Posole stew.[citation needed]

    Radish greens are usually discarded, but are edible and nutritious, and can be prepared in a variety of ways.[30][31] The leaves are sometimes used in recipes, like potato soup or as a sauteed side dish. They are also found blended with fruit juices in some recipes.[32]

    In Indian cuisine the seed pods are called "moongra" or "mogri" and can be used in many dishes.[33][34]

  • Rapini

    Rapini Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    The flavor of rapini has been described as nutty, bitter, and pungent, as well as almond-flavored. Rapini needs little more than a trim at the base. The entire stalk is edible when young, but the base becomes more fibrous as the season advances.

    Rapini is widely used in southern Italian cuisine,in particular that of Sicily,Calabria Campania, Apulia (Puglia), and Rome. In Italian, rapini is called cime di rapa or broccoletti di rapa;in Naples, the green is often called friarielli. Within Portuguese cuisine, grelos de nabo are similar in taste and texture to broccoli rabe.Rapini is also popular in the Galicia region of northwestern Spain; a rapini festival (Feira do grelo) is held in the Galician town of As Pontes every February.

    Rapini may be sautéed or braised with olive oil and garlic, and sometimes chili pepper and anchovy.[8]It may be used as an ingredient in soup, served with orecchiette,other pasta, or pan-fried sausage  Rapini is sometimes (but not always) blanched before being cooked further.

    In the United States, rapini is popular in Italian-American kitchens; the D'Arrigo Brothers popularized the ingredient in the United States and gave it the name broccoli rabe. Broccoli rabe is a component of some hoagies and submarine sandwiches; in Philadelphia, a popular sandwich is roast pork with broccoli rabe and peppers. It can be a component of pasta dishes, especially when accompanied by Italian sausage.

  • Rhubarb

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    The species Rheum ribes has been eaten in the Islamic world since the 10th century.

    In Northern Europe and North America, the stalks are commonly cut into pieces and stewed with added sugar until soft. The resulting compote, sometimes thickened with cornstarch, can then be used in pies, tarts and crumbles. Alternatively, greater quantities of sugar can be added with pectin to make jams. A paired spice used is ginger, although cinnamon and nutmeg are also common additions. In the United Kingdom, as well as being used in the typical pies, tarts and crumbles, rhubarb compote is also combined with whipped cream or custard to make respectively rhubarb fool. In the United States, the common usage of rhubarb in pies has led to it being nicknamed "pie plant", by which it is referred to in 19th-century cookbooks.Rhubarb in the US is also often paired with strawberries to make strawberry-rhubarb pie, though some rhubarb purists jokingly consider this "a rather unhappy marriage".

    Rhubarb can also be used to make alcoholic drinks, such as fruit wines or Finnish Rhubarb sima (mead). It is also used to make Kompot.

  • Seaweed

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Spinach

    Spinach Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

     It may be eaten cooked or raw, and the taste differs considerably; the high oxalate content may be reduced by steaming.

    It is an annual plant (rarely biennial), growing as tall as 30 cm (1 ft). Spinach may overwinter in temperate regions. The leaves are alternate, simple, ovate to triangular, and very variable in size: 2–30 cm (1–12 in) long and 1–15 cm (0.4–5.9 in) broad, with larger leaves at the base of the plant and small leaves higher on the flowering stem. The flowers are inconspicuous, yellow-green, 3–4 mm (0.1–0.2 in) in diameter, and mature into a small, hard, dry, lumpy fruit cluster 5–10 mm (0.2–0.4 in) across containing several seeds.

  • Swiss Chard

    Swiss Chard Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    Chard or Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris, Cicla Group and Flavescens Group) (/tʃɑːrd/) is a green leafy vegetable. In the cultivars of the Flavescens Group, the leaf stalks are large and often prepared separately from the leaf blade;[1] the Cicla Group is the leafy spinach beet. The leaf blade can be green or reddish in color; the leaf stalks are usually white, or a colorful yellow or red.[2]

    Chard, like other green leafy vegetables, has highly nutritious leaves, making it a popular component of healthy diets.[3] Chard has been used in cooking for centuries, but because it is the same species as beetroot, and similar to vegetables such as cardoon, the common names that cooks and cultures have used for chard may be confusing;[4] it has many common names, such as silver beet, perpetual spinach, beet spinach, seakale beet, or leaf beet.[5][6]

  • Squash

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Tomato

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    The tomato is now grown and eaten around the world. It is used in diverse ways, including raw in salads or in slices, stewed, incorporated into a wide variety of dishes, or processed into ketchup or tomato soup. Unripe green tomatoes can also be breaded and fried, used to make salsa, or pickled. Tomato juice is sold as a drink, and is used in cocktails such as the Bloody Mary.

  • Tomatillo

    Tomatillo

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    The tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica and Physalis ixocarpa), also known as the Mexican husk tomato, is a plant of the nightshade family bearing small, spherical and green or green-purple fruit of the same name. Tomatillos originated in Mexico and were cultivated in the pre-Columbian era. A staple of Mexican cuisine, they are eaten raw and cooked in a variety of dishes, particularly salsa verde.

  • Turnip

    Turnip Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

  • Zucchini

    Zucchini Vegetable Seeds

    Featuring heirloom, open-pollinated, non-GMO, untreated seeds.

    When used for food, zucchini are usually picked when under 20 cm (8 in) in length, when the seeds are still soft and immature. Mature zucchini can be 1 m (40 in) long or more. These larger ones often have mature seeds and hard skins, requiring peeling and seeding. A zucchini with the flowers attached is a sign of a truly fresh and immature fruit, and it is especially sought after for its sweeter flavor.[17]

    Unlike cucumber, zucchini is usually served cooked. It can be prepared using a variety of cooking techniques, including steamed, boiled, grilled, stuffed and baked, barbecued, fried, or incorporated in other recipes such as soufflés. Zucchini can also be baked into a zucchini bread,[18] similar to banana bread, or incorporated into a cake mix to make zucchini cake, similar to carrot cake. Its flowers can be eaten stuffed and are a delicacy when deep fat fried (e.g., tempura).

    Zucchini has a delicate flavor and requires little more than quick cooking with butter or olive oil, with or without fresh herbs.[19] The skin is left in place. Quick cooking of barely wet zucchini in oil or butter allows the fruit to partially boil and steam, with the juices concentrated in the final moments of frying when the water has gone, prior to serving. Zucchini can also be eaten raw, sliced or shredded, in a cold salad, as well as lightly cooked in hot salads, as in Thai or Vietnamese recipes. Mature (larger sized) zucchini are well suited for cooking in breads.

    Zucchinis can be cut with a spiralizer into noodle-like spirals and used as a low-carbohydrate substitute for pasta or noodles, often referred to as 'Zoodles'.

    In Bulgaria, zucchini may be fried and then served with a dip, made from yogurt, garlic, and dill. Another popular dish is oven-baked zucchini—sliced or grated—covered with a mixture of eggs, yogurt, flour, and dill.

    In Egypt, zucchini may be cooked with tomato sauce, garlic, and onions.

    In France, zucchini is a key ingredient in ratatouille, a stew of summer vegetable-fruits and vegetables prepared in olive oil and cooked for an extended time over low heat. The dish, originating near present-day Nice, is served as a side dish or on its own at lunch with bread. Zucchini may be stuffed with meat or with other fruits such as tomatoes or bell peppers in a dish called courgette farcie (stuffed zucchini).

    In Greece, zucchini is usually fried or stewed with other fruits (often green chili peppers and eggplants). It is served as an hors d'œuvre or as a main dish, especially during fasting seasons. Zucchini is also stuffed with minced meat, rice, and herbs and served with avgolemono sauce. In several parts of Greece, the flowers of the plant are stuffed with white cheese, usually feta or mizithra, or with a mixture of rice, herbs, and occasionally minced meat. They are then deep-fried or baked in the oven with tomato sauce.

    In Italy, zucchini is served in a variety of ways: fried, baked, boiled, or deep fried, alone or in combination with other ingredients. At home and in some restaurants, it is possible to eat the flowers, as well, deep-fried, known as fiori di zucca (cf. pumpkin flower fritter).

    In the cuisines of the former Ottoman Empire, zucchini is often stuffed and called dolma. It is also used in various stews, both with and without meat, including ladera.

    In Mexico, the flower (known as flor de calabaza) is often cooked in soups or used as a filling for quesadillas. The fruit is used in stews, soups (i.e. caldo de res, de pollo, or de pescado, mole de olla, etc.) and other preparations. The flower, as well as the fruit, is eaten often throughout Latin America.

    Sliced zucchini for preparation of salad

    In Russia, Ukraine and other CIS countries, zucchini usually is coated in flour or semolina and then fried or baked in vegetable oil, served with sour cream. Another popular recipe is "zucchini caviar", a squash spread made from thermically processed zucchini, carrots, onions and tomato paste, produced either at home or industrially as a vegetable preserve.

    In Turkey, zucchini is the main ingredient in the popular dish mücver, or "zucchini pancakes", made from shredded zucchini, flour, and eggs, lightly fried in olive oil and eaten with yogurt. They are also often used in kebabs along with various meats. The flowers are also used in a cold dish, where they are stuffed with a rice mix with various spices and nuts and stewed.

    In 2005, a poll of 2,000 people revealed it to be Britain's 10th favorite culinary vegetable.

    Stuffed zucchini is found in many cuisines. Typical stuffings in the Middle Eastern family of dolma include rice, onions, tomato, and sometimes meat.

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Keystone Giant Bell Pepper


In Stock
$2.49

Non-GMO - Heirloom - Open Pollinated - High Germination Rate

Seeds For: Vegetable Gardening

Days to Full Maturity: 70 -- Annual --

Type Peppers
Family Nightshade Family
Temperature Soil 65-80F
Temperature Daytime 70-90F
Temperature Evening 60+F
Lighting Full Sun, 6-8 Hours/Day
Water Heavy, 6 Gallons/Day
Maturity Moderate, 65-85 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 5.5-7.0
Zones 4A-11B
Plant Placement 6 Plants, 3  Row
Rossa di Tropea Italian Elongated Red Onion, Torpedo Onion, Calabrese - [ Seed2Go - Canada ] - VG-RPO - Onion
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Rossa di Tropea Italian Elongated Red Onion, Torpedo Onion, Calabrese


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$2.49

Torpedo-shaped, with soft light-red flesh and mild, sweet flavor. Red onions are an Italian specialty. Their thin, red to purple skin and mild, soft light-red mild flesh make them especially popular as a decorative salad onion. Torpedo-shaped onion with soft light-red flesh has mild, sweet flavor.

Type Onion
Family Allium Family
Temperature Soil 40F+
Temperature Daytime 55-75F
Temperature Evening 45+F
Lighting Full, 6-8 Hous Per Day
Water Steady, 6 Gallons / Week
Maturity Long, 80-120 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 5.5-6.5
Zones 3A-9B
Plant Placement 12 Plants, 3 Per Row
Red Pickled Pearl Onion - [ Seed2Go - Canada ] - VG-RPO - Onion
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Red Pickled Pearl Onion


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$2.49

Red Pearl onions are small in size, averaging 1-4 centimeters in diameter, and are globular in shape with slightly pointed ends. The petite bulb is covered in a burgundy, thin, papery, parchment that easily flakes off when touched.

Type Onion
Family Allium Family
Temperature Soil 40F+
Temperature Daytime 55-75F
Temperature Evening 45+F
Lighting Full, 6-8 Hous Per Day
Water Steady, 6 Gallons / Week
Maturity Long, 80-120 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 5.5-6.5
Zones 3A-9B
Plant Placement 12 Plants, 3 Per Row
Spicy Red Creole Onion - [ Seed2Go - Canada ] - VG-RCO - Onion
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Spicy Red Creole Onion


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$2.49

Red Creole Onion is an heirloom, open-pollinated variety that produces bright red, flat onions. This is a short-day onion that performs well in southern climates. Red Creole has a great onion flavor and crisp texture that's perfect for cooking or eating raw in salads.

Red Creole has a great onion flavor and crisp texture that’s perfect for cooking or eating raw in salads. This onion has a spicy, Cajun type flavor and can be added to any dish for a bolder experience

Type Onion
Family Allium Family
Temperature Soil 40F+
Temperature Daytime 55-75F
Temperature Evening 45+F
Lighting Full, 6-8 Hous Per Day
Water Steady, 6 Gallons / Week
Maturity Long, 80-120 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 5.5-6.5
Zones 3A-9B
Plant Placement 12 Plants, 3 Per Row
Red Baron Bunching Onion, Organic - [ Seed2Go - Canada ] - VG-RBO - Onion
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Red Baron Bunching Onion, Organic


In Stock
$2.49

'Red Baron Has round red bulbs, with pretty red and white flesh and a stronger onion flavour than most red onions.

Ideal for using in raw in salads and in cooked dishes, and bulbs store well into winter.

Type Onion
Family Allium Family
Temperature Soil 40F+
Temperature Daytime 55-75F
Temperature Evening 45+F
Lighting Full, 6-8 Hous Per Day
Water Steady, 6 Gallons / Week
Maturity Long, 80-120 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 5.5-6.5
Zones 3A-9B
Plant Placement 12 Plants, 3 Per Row

Snijmoes Lucullus Dutch Swiss Chard


In Stock
$2.49

Ancient from the Netherlands with light green slightly savoyed leaves and white/pale green stalks. 

Type Swiss Chard
Family Cabbage Family
Temperature Soil 55-70F
Temperature Daytime 40-50F
Temperature Evening 45+F
Lighting Full, 6-8 Hous Per Day
Water Steady, 6 Gallons / Week
Maturity Short, 55-65 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 6.0-7.5
Zones 1A-8B
Plant Placement 3 Plants, 3 Per Row

 

Bright Orange Eldorado Swiss Chard


In Stock
$2.49

Orange stocks and green leaves great for salads or steamed side plate.

Golden Swiss chard can be used similarly to other leafy greens and chard varieties and may be eaten raw when young, but larger leaves are best cooked. They can be sautéed, blanched, stewed, braised, baked, and even grilled. Use raw leaves to add an earthy saltiness and a bright color to salad mixes. Slow cook entire stalks similarly to collards, though some of their golden color may lessen and become dull, and compliment with smoked meats and white beans. Wilt the shredded leaves into pastas or atop pizzas and flatbreads. The golden stalks are as equally edible as the leaves, and may be used in dishes for added texture. Complimentary flavors include citrus, tomatoes, garlic, shallots, chickpeas, white beans, potatoes, aged and melting cheeses, cream, mushrooms, bacon, sausage, ham, chili flakes, fennel and herbs such as basil, tarragon and chervil

Type Swiss Chard
Family Cabbage Family
Temperature Soil 55-70F
Temperature Daytime 40-50F
Temperature Evening 45+F
Lighting Full, 6-8 Hous Per Day
Water Steady, 6 Gallons / Week
Maturity Short, 55-65 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 6.0-7.5
Zones 1A-8B
Plant Placement 3 Plants, 3 Per Row

Packet: 9-10 grams of seed

 

Golden Yellow Bell Pepper, California Wonder Pepper


In Stock
$2.49

Golden Cal Wonder Bell Pepper Seeds – An American heirloom since 1920. This prolific trouble-free pepper is one of the best open-pollinated yellow bells available. It has a very sweet flavor making it a wonderful addition to salads, stir-fries, and any dish where great color and sweet taste are desired.

The ever-bearing upright plants produce fruit 4" long and 4" wide. Peppers mature from light green to golden-yellow and grow on sturdy 24" tall plants. Capsicum annuum (75 days) Organic - Heirloom - Open Pollinated - Organic

Heat Level: None - Sweet Pepper

In early spring, start seeds indoors 8 weeks prior to warm nightly temperatures. Place the seeds in sterile media and cover 1/4” deep. Provide 85°F bottom heat, bright light and keep moist at all times. Seeds will germinate in 7 - 21 days. Transplant seedlings into pots and grow until there are 6 true leaves on the plant. Plant them directly into rich soil, 30” apart or into large 5 gallon containers. Harvest peppers when they are yellow and full size.

 
Type Peppers
Family Nightshade Family
Temperature Soil 65-80F
Temperature Daytime 70-90F
Temperature Evening 60+F
Lighting Full Sun, 6-8 Hours/Day
Water Heavy, 6 Gallons/Day
Maturity Moderate, 65-85 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 5.5-7.0
Zones 4A-11B
Plant Placement 6 Plants, 3  Row

Chinese Leaf, Turnip Top, Brassica Rapa, Turnip Top Namenia


In Stock
$2.49
Green leaf with serrated edges. Tastes like spicy spinach.
Brassicas can be annual, biennial or perennial plants, most are upright with alternate, often glaucous leaves, long taproots and clusters of cross-shaped, yellow or white flowers. The genus includes a number of species bred to produce food crops, such as cabbages, turnips, mustards and oilseed rape, as well as others grown for their ornamental value
Spring vegetable. The plants bolter very early during summer. The leaves can turn yellow when given too little fertilization. The yellow leaves can be eaten. This variety is excellent for stews or raw consumption in a salad.
Type Turnip
Family Cabbage Family
Temperature Soil 50-65F
Temperature Daytime 60-75F
Temperature Evening 40+F
Lighting Light, Full, 4-6 Hours / Day
Water Heady, 6 Gal / Week
Maturity Short, 35-55 Days
PH Neutral Ph Neutral, 5.5-6.8
Zones 3A-9b
Plant Placement 12 Plants, 3 Per Row

 

Yugoslavian Red Butterhead


In Stock
$2.49
Rainbow of colors---red, yellow and green. The superb, mild-flavored leaves are a delight to eat and to grow. 
Type Lettuce
Family Daisy Family
Temperature Soil 40-50F
Temperature Daytime 50-65F
Temperature Evening 40F+
Lighting Partial / Light, 2-4 Hours/Day
Water Light, 3 Gallons/Week
Maturity Moderate, 60-70 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 7.0-8.0
Zones 4A-9B
Plant Placement 8 Plants, 4 Per Row

 

 

Tango Lettuce, Looseleaf


In Stock
$2.49

Loose leaf, tango-type.

8" tall and 12" wide with frilly leaves. Mildly sweet flavour. 

Type Lettuce
Family Daisy Family
Temperature Soil 40-50F
Temperature Daytime 50-65F
Temperature Evening 40F+
Lighting Partial / Light, 2-4 Hours/Day
Water Light, 3 Gallons/Week
Maturity Moderate, 60-70 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 7.0-8.0
Zones 4A-9B
Plant Placement 8 Plants, 4 Per Row

 

 

Organic Mezquite Green Romaine Lettuce, Semi-Savoy


In Stock
$2.49
Bright green color and crisp texture that you look for in a romaine. The large heads have straight ribs and are formed on compact, upright, plants. 

Type

Salad Greens
Family Cabbage Family
Temperature Soil 55-75F
Temperature Daytime 50-65F
Temperature Evening 40F+
Lighting Partial / Full, 4-6 Hours/Day
Water Light,6 Gallons/Week
Maturity Short, 30-55 Days Harvest
PH Neutral 6.5-7.2
Zones 1A-9B
Plant Placement 4 Plants, 4 Per Row

Organic Iceberg Lettuce, Crisphead Lettuce


In Stock
$2.49

Iceberg lettuce grows in small, dense heads. Commonly used in salads and sandwiches, they are prized more for their texture and crispiness than for the flavor of the leaves themselves. Iceberg was first cultivated in the Salinas Valley of California, then packed in ice and distributed across the US on trains, earning its namesake. Space plants 12" apart with 18" between rows.

These are the family favourite lettuce variety for salads and sandwiches. Make sure to give steady watering throughout the year to allow for these to properly shape into round, firm heads.  Your kids will thank you!

78 Days to Harvest!